Bart Martin was born and raised in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, though he would like to think he was born and raised in Middle-earth. He attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point where he majored in philosophy. During his five years as an M1A1 Abrams tank platoon leader and company executive officer, he discovered that his real love is teaching. After getting out of the Army, Bart taught Latin, logic, Greek, rhetoric, literature, government and theology at several different classical Christian schools. While teaching, he earned a Master of Divinity Degree at Reformed Episcopal Seminary in Philadelphia, and was subsequently ordained in the Reformed Episcopal Church.

Bart’s not a fan of lecturing. Instead, he likes to create dialogue and debate about issues that matter and that are relevant to his students today. He appeals to his students’ imaginations, challenging them to consider why people from, say, the Middle Ages would believe and think the things they do. In class, you might find him impersonating a believer in Norse mythology and inviting the students to debate his imagined persona. Besides loving conversations like these, his students learn to think more broadly and deeply about what it means to be a living, breathing member of God’s kingdom.

In addition to teaching at Wilson Hill Academy, Mr. Martin is a lacrosse referee and a chaplain in the U.S. Army Reserves. Along with teaching, his greatest loves are God’s kingdom, his wife of twenty years, his four children, his small suburban farm, anything related to Tolkien’s Middle-earth and anything having to do with football or lacrosse . . . but also basketball, hockey, soccer, handball, tennis, ultimate frisbee, or (insert any other sport here).

“What I most love about teaching students at Wilson Hill is that the students are often so curious that I am the one who ends up learning important truths from them.”

 

Courses taught by Bart Martin

The Great Conversation 2 and 5
Get to Know C.S. Lewis
Get to Know J.R.R. Tolkien
Get to Know Wendell Berry (Summer)