Classical Christian Computer Science?

As a husband and father in a family immersed in classical Christian education for over a decade, I have seen the tremendous value of this philosophy of teaching.  Students learn how to understand both history and modern culture through the study of Scripture and classic literature.  They learn to appreciate the order and beauty of God’s creation through math and science.  They gain skills in persuasion and communication through logic and rhetoric.  How could a

Guess Who’s Coming to LINK?

24 May 2018

Thanks to one of our dear WHA families, we have more exciting news about LINK 2018!  Next week, WHA has the privilege of welcoming The Gray Havens to Texas!  On Friday evening, Dave and Licia Radford will entertain our families with a private concert. Keep reading to learn more about this captivating couple and why we can't wait to host them. Three words. That’s how it started. Three words that teased the start of a story, a story

Wait and Go on the 30

1 May 2018

Have you ever wanted to pull your car to the side of the road, get out, sit on the curb and have a good cry? You’ve been juggling end-of-school schedules, kids, the expectations of others, such that it seems like your world is spinning out of control.  And now that the school year is over, summer activities threaten to be just as overwhelming.  Is there a solution? Perhaps a principle from a different context will

Sunsets & Science

24 Apr 2018

As a science teacher at a classical school, I occasionally hear my humanities students ask, “Why study high school science?” Sometimes, I try to convince these bookworms that a chemistry textbook can be a fascinating read. But since that’s mostly met with incredulity, I like to share a story. For several summers, my family and I have camped at a small quiet campground on a hill, a lovely park tucked behind a ridge of trees.

Lowcountry Live 2018!

17 Apr 2018

Recently, Wilson Hill Academy families and faculty gathered in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore the lowcountry. There they paddled past "fresh water marsh, limestone bluffs and old rice fields" as part of their guided kayak tour along Wadboo Creek. They heard how this tributary of the Cooper River was "once home to grand plantations and a booming antebellum economy. The limestone bluffs are reputed to have been used by the Revolutionary War Hero, General Francis

Now and Not Yet: An Easter Reflection

If I am going to be honest, the coming of spring contains something of a paradox for our family’s life on our farm.  The return of the birds, the budding flowers and fruit trees, the leaves on the maples and hackberries and oaks, the bulbous plants and seedlings in the garden, the newborn calves and kids and piglets, the smells of fresh air and the renewal of life, all serve as a seasonal and visceral

Our Very Own Indiana Jones!

29 Mar 2018

WHA earth science and Greek 1 teacher, Shelby Bowden, may not have starred in any movies yet, but his life certainly resembles one now and again. Shelby is a structural geologist, which means he studies how, when and why the Earth’s surface deforms. This type of research surveys mountains, valleys, faults, islands . . . really any part of the Earth’s surface. Shelby's work takes him to far flung destinations like Guam (west Pacific) and,