Not on My Watch

Doubt is often the domain of mothers. Mothers who school their children at home seem particularly plagued because they make decision in two realms: in the home and in the school. Even the graduation of a child from homeschooling and into the next stage of life does not release mothers from the nagging thought that perhaps she should have done something (or even everything) differently. Second-guessing curriculum or providers or even the decision to homeschool

Wait and Go on the 30

Swimming8 Jul 2016

Have you ever wanted to pull your car to the side of the road, get out, sit on the curb and have a good cry? You’ve been juggling end-of-school schedules, kids, the expectations of others, such that it seems like your world is spinning out of control.  And now that the school year is over, summer activities threaten to be just as overwhelming.  Is there a solution? Perhaps a principle from a different context will

Independence Day

chicago-fireworks5 Jul 2016

Today is the 5th of July.  I hope your celebration of the 4th included ice cream, hot dogs, swimming pools, fireworks and many other common ways we celebrate “Independence Day”.  But as we celebrated yesterday, I also noticed that our culture seems far more focused on the three-day weekend celebration than on the liberties we often take for granted.  If Rip Van Winkle were to awake again two centuries after his “brief” two-decade nap, what

Chickens in Church

Chickens in Church9 Jun 2016

The following is an open letter from Scott Baker, WHA Rhetoric Instructor, to his students in the Rhetoric 2/Senior Thesis class this year. Dear Seniors: Congratulations on a great year completing the Senior Thesis process!  Now that you have survived the Defense and have completed your Final Draft, it’s time to celebrate.  Everyone in the WHA community is suitably proud of your achievement, especially since writing and defending a thesis is such a rare accomplishment

Need a Jumpstart this Summer?

A number of years ago, when I taught in a brick-and-mortar classical and Christian school, I had student whom I will call “Sam.”  Sam would not be described by anyone with superlative adjectives like “brilliant” or “genius”. However, he was a hard-working, conscientious student who was highly respected by all his teachers. In his sophomore year of high school, he started to really struggle academically.  Why?   He was very active in sports and other extra-curricular

Is History Boring?

"You teach history? How do you make that interesting?" Every history or social science teacher hears that question at least once, and likely many times. But even a quick look at a typical "social studies" textbook, leaving aside the endless monotony of charts, diagrams, textboxes and the like, is enough to make one wonder the very apt question: How do you make that interesting? Perhaps the most direct answer to the question is that "making

Sombremesa

MexicoTrip311 Mar 2016

Two weeks ago, Mrs. Pliego hosted a group of Wilson Hill Academy Spanish students for a week in Mexico City. This was a wonderful opportunity for us, not only as Spanish students but also as online students. Granted, the trip certainly provided academic gain, but, perhaps more importantly, it provided a platform on which we built and strengthened our relationships with each other. On a typical international school trip, the schedule is so full of

Thank you, Mr. Lowery

When I ask a teacher why he or she became a teacher, the response often is, “I became a teacher because (fill in the blank with the name of an incredibly inspirational person) had a tremendous impact on my life.” This is true in my own case. It would be difficult for me to articulate the positive influence Miss Rupp had on my life. I attended public school at a time when the Bible was

Latin for Life

Gwynne’s Latin is a fairly new Latin textbook, written by British grammarian N. M. Gwynne. A little book with a cheerful yellow cover, it is small enough to fit inside my purse, which is a good thing since it is a real page-turner and I don’t like to leave home without it. I hope you do not think I am strange for reading a Latin textbook for fun – I am, after all, a Latin

A Whole Class on the War for Independence?

Why would we spend an entire year on the War for Independence (or what many call the "American Revolution")? Wouldn't that simply be overkill? Good question. I suspect the line of thought implied in this question results from habit — a certain kind of academic habit in which we are used to thinking that the goal of a history (or, more commonly today, "social science") class is coverage. A very quick look at any typical